Central Neighbourhood Plan

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The District is undertaking a large planning process for Silverdale to guide future growth and development, and to plan a sustainable and complete community that reflects Silverdale's unique sense of place.

This area, sometimes known as Southwest Mission, is defined in Mission’s Official Community Plan as the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area (SCPA).

Because of SCPA’s large size, planning will be completed within three separate neighbourhoods: Central Neighbourhood, West Neighbourhood and East Neighbourhood.

Work on the Central Neighbourhood Plan, which covers 733 hectares (1811.28 acres), is currently underway.

The following pillars will be used to guide the Central Neighbourhood Plan:

  • Ecological: Working with nature
  • Social: Living lightly
  • Economic: Support local lifestyles

Read more about each of the pillars in the Planning Principles document.

Planning Area

The following map outlines the Central Neighbourhood Plan area:

A map showing the Central Neighbourhood Planning Area

Supporting Strategies, Plans & Principles

Learn about the strategies, plans and principles supporting Central Neighbourhood planning:

Master Infrastructure Strategy – A technically based, long-term strategy to support servicing of the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area. This strategy was completed in early 2020 and was important for laying the groundwork for planning the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area.

Official Community Plan A bylaw representing Mission’s vision for the future and framework to support growth and decisions about land use development, resources and the environment.

LAN 64(c) Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area Neighbourhood Planning Terms of Reference A Council policy to guide neighbourhood planning within the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area.

Central Neighbourhood Plan Guiding Principles – Planning for the Central Neighbourhood Plan will be focused on three pillars, ecological, social and economic, and lay the framework for what the Central Neighbourhood Plan will look and feel like.

3D Model Flythrough Videos

  • Video 1 | Site Analysis + Development Potential
  • Video 2 | CNP Foundation Land Use Plan

  • Video 3 | Review Visual Impact Buffer


The District is undertaking a large planning process for Silverdale to guide future growth and development, and to plan a sustainable and complete community that reflects Silverdale's unique sense of place.

This area, sometimes known as Southwest Mission, is defined in Mission’s Official Community Plan as the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area (SCPA).

Because of SCPA’s large size, planning will be completed within three separate neighbourhoods: Central Neighbourhood, West Neighbourhood and East Neighbourhood.

Work on the Central Neighbourhood Plan, which covers 733 hectares (1811.28 acres), is currently underway.

The following pillars will be used to guide the Central Neighbourhood Plan:

  • Ecological: Working with nature
  • Social: Living lightly
  • Economic: Support local lifestyles

Read more about each of the pillars in the Planning Principles document.

Planning Area

The following map outlines the Central Neighbourhood Plan area:

A map showing the Central Neighbourhood Planning Area

Supporting Strategies, Plans & Principles

Learn about the strategies, plans and principles supporting Central Neighbourhood planning:

Master Infrastructure Strategy – A technically based, long-term strategy to support servicing of the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area. This strategy was completed in early 2020 and was important for laying the groundwork for planning the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area.

Official Community Plan A bylaw representing Mission’s vision for the future and framework to support growth and decisions about land use development, resources and the environment.

LAN 64(c) Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area Neighbourhood Planning Terms of Reference A Council policy to guide neighbourhood planning within the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area.

Central Neighbourhood Plan Guiding Principles – Planning for the Central Neighbourhood Plan will be focused on three pillars, ecological, social and economic, and lay the framework for what the Central Neighbourhood Plan will look and feel like.

3D Model Flythrough Videos

  • Video 1 | Site Analysis + Development Potential
  • Video 2 | CNP Foundation Land Use Plan

  • Video 3 | Review Visual Impact Buffer


CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Have a question about the Central Neighbourhood Plan? We are here to listen. All questions will be answered at the end of the Open House and may take up to 5 business days. Thank you!

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    Robert Public has stated that "Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESA’s) are quite often land space that the developer does not want due to being unusable. This scenario leads to the area appearing as parkland on the plans but due to not being usable park space the District will require an additional 5% be contributed." How much dedicated neighbourhood and community parkland in the CNP is considered "useable" by the public. Why is there no District sized park (like Heritage park) in this plan?

    Tracy asked 3 months ago

    Clarifying note: The quote above was from Robert Publow, Manager of Planning, not Robert Public. He stated this at the Parks and Recreation meeting May 11/21 according to the meeting minutes.


    Response:

    The useable parkland proposed within the CNP far exceeds the minimum 5% requirement.

    The CNP provides three categories of parkland, with “useable” parkland often understood as developable lands, less than 30% in slope and outside of regulated riparian areas. Of the first category, Joint Elementary School + Neighbourhood Parks, the entire area – 12 acres of total parkland – will be useable to the public. The second category, Neighbourhood Parks, will also be 100% useable by the public. 

    Community Parks are located to provide access and enjoyment of significant natural features and serve as defining recreational destinations for the community. While other park categories are focused on active recreation, Community Parks will include both useable programmed areas, as well as significant “unusable” protected natural landscapes, together establishing a natural park legacy for Silverdale. Public Access to the Community Parks will be determined through a Parks Management Plan, to be prepared in conjunction with the City of Mission Parks Department. 

    While Heritage Park provides an urban landscape park reflective of Mission’s pioneering history of land clearing and agriculture, the CNP’s Community Parks reflect Silverdale’s natural forest landscape.

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    While it is understood that the preliminary design options are a high level but foundational document, the use of terms such as "Townhome" and "Single Family Urban" are confusing. Mission's Consolidated Zoning Bylaw uses the term "Townhouse" within the context of Ground Oriented Multi-Family zoning which generally relates to the "Residential Land Use, Medium Density I Townhomes for Ground-Oriented Living" documents presented here but "Single Family Urban" doesn't directly translate. The "per acre" numbers are the closest clue but don't specify whether they are averages or referring to a specific housing form. For example, single family urban could easily encompass CD zones of "single family compact" which would represent a transitional housing / density type for each neighbourhood where physical and servicing constraints dictate their use. In fact, they represent an option that is "...largely consistent with the new type of housing form that is envisioned by the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area." ( CD44 Zone Planning Analysis for Nelson and Galiford ). As a visioning document that will inform future decisions and directions vis a vis specific zoning applications in the future, perhaps it not be more desirable to use "Ground-Oriented Mulit-family" and remove the specific per acre density numbers in order to reflect what will quite probably be a more complete and diverse range of zoning / housing options than currently depicted?

    scudderclan asked 3 months ago

    Building on the SCPA-wide Master Infrastructure Strategy, the Central Neighbourhood Plan structures land use and servicing decisions to manage growth towards building healthy, more complete and sustaining urban neighbourhoods. The CNP provides required detailed planning and engineering to assist in reconciling the competing issues of land use, environment, density, infrastructure, and implementation issues, serving as a comprehensive guide for managing future rezoning and subdivision applications.

    The Single Family Urban land use presented in the CNP Design Foundation + Options reflects single ground-oriented homes at an average urban density. Distribution of the residential densities that result from specific housing forms is a fundamental driver for Neighbourhood Planning.

    Following adoption of the CNP, a separate rezoning process will be undertaken using updated zones that reflect the vision and land use designations of the Neighbourhood Plan. 

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    Looking at one of the maps I see the name 'Silvermere Village'. I have only lived here in Silverdale for 53 years and am a relative newcomer compared to some who reside here. Wanting you to know how displeased I am to see the aforementioned name in place of 'Silverdale' right where our Silverdale Hall and School are located. Why would someone come along and take the name of Silverdale from our core and put in Silvermere in its stead? That is my question. I find that the higher ups come along and stick names on maps and before you know it, we are called by a different name. My husband was raised in the community of McConnell Creek coming to that community in 1944. The treatment center for alcoholics came a number of years after he did and was known as Miracle Valley established by the Salvation Army. My husband gets very disgruntled when he looks at maps of that area and the name McConnell Creek has now been replaced by Miracle Valley. That is how small communities and the pride folk have in them begin to vanish. We have a man-made lake in Silverdale called Silvermere Lake, however, I am not aware of an area called Silvermere Village and please don't change our name out here to that or South West Mission or any other name. Let us be Silverdale, Silverhill, Ruskin, Whonnock, Stave Falls, Steelhead, etc., etc. Thank you.

    SilverdaleSheila asked 3 months ago

    The Silvermere Village Precinct is located outside of the Central Neighbourhood and is not within the scope of this Neighbourhood Plan. The names of the 13 Precincts presented in the Master Infrastructure Strategy are intended to reflect their individual landscape identity and character. They are working titles as part of a planning document and are not adopted names. The name Silverdale is understood to refer to the broader area including the West, Central, and East Neighbourhood’s of the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area.

    The Council-adopted Guiding Planning Principles for the CNP call for “memorializing local people, places, events and known archaeological sites by promoting local and indigenous history”. Future planning for the West Neighbourhood may also incorporate local place names, which may include using indigenous place names where appropriate and approved by local First Nations. 

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    Why aren’t you guys aiding in the already over crowed and overwhelmed infrastructure instead of plowing down our beautiful mission forrests that attracted to many to begin with.

    Cry asked 3 months ago

    While our Project Team is focused on preparing the CNP, revenue for the City will be generated through development of a new neighbourhood in the form of Development Cost Charges, Community Amenity Contributions, and increasing the City’s tax base. Civic amenities and revenue generated by the CNP will be for the benefit of all residents of Mission, not just those within Silverdale’s Central Neighbourhood. The public trunk infrastructure being planned will also serve to support required upgrades to existing Mission infrastructure, such as the twinning of the sanitary main to the JAMES treatment plant.

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    How many acres of trees will be cut? Will there be replacement? What will the overall tree canopy targets for this development be? Mature trees appear important to mask the development. What will be in place to protect the remaining mature trees?

    Tracy asked 3 months ago

    Achieving the target set by the Master Infrastructure Strategy, 40% of the identified CNP lands will be conserved in its natural state within the Neighbourhood Conservation Framework, protecting steep slopes, riparian corridors, Community Parks, Wildlife Corridors, Visual Impact Buffers, and recreational trail linkages where suitable. Through the phased build-out of the CNP, up to 60% of the identified CNP lands are planned for future community development. 

    Trees in the conservation framework may be protected through park designation, Section 219 covenants, or other mechanisms, to be determined during the Preferred Neighbourhood Plan Phase in conjunction with the City of Mission. The neighbourhood will also include planting of new additional trees as part of landscaping, street trees, neighbourhood parks, and plazas.

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    How can we understand the visual impact when there are no buildings depicted in the computer mapping, only trees and flat coloured areas which may create a false impression? If the computer can depict trees, why not buildings?

    Tracy asked 3 months ago

    The Preliminary Design Options 3D Terrain Model presents a landscape representation of the visual buffer provided specifically by the Neighbourhood Conservation Framework through retained existing trees based on 2020 LiDAR data. As the average tree height presented on the model is between 15-18 m, the Neighbourhood Conservation Framework serves to screen proposed land uses with the exception of potential apartment and mixed-use buildings. In addition to trees presented on the model, the CNP neighbourhood will also include the planting of new trees for landscaping, street trees, neighbourhood parks, and plazas. Examples of 3D buildings will be illustrated on the Preferred Neighbourhood Plan model.

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    What is being planned to reduce the immediate and long-term carbon impact of this development?

    Tracy asked 3 months ago

    As a sustaining, complete, mixed-use urban neighbourhood, the CNP incorporates the following series of design principles and features to support a more carbon efficient community: 

    1. Comprehensive Development Planning
    2. Environmental Impact Assessment
    3. Conservation Framework
    4. Walkable Mixed-Use Centres
    5. Integrated Public Park Network
    6. Neighbourhood Commercial Retail
    7. Livable Street Standards
    8. Transit Supported Neighbourhoods
    9. Integrated Pedestrian + Cycling Networks
    10. Hillside Development Best Management Practices
    11. Urban Land Use Densities
    12. Diversity of Housing to meet a range of lifestyles, life-stages and incomes
    13. Comprehensive Public Sanitary Collection + Treatment
    14. Comprehensive Public Water Treatment + Supply
    15. Comprehensive Public Integrated Stormwater Management Infrastructure
    16. Underground Urban Utility Services
    17. Low-Impact Development Standards
    18. New Urban Land Use Zones
    19. Design Guidelines
    20. Dark Sky Lighting Principles
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    How much of the parkland will be accessible to the public? How will conservation areas be protected from human impacts? When will the public have access to the neighbourhood park? Do we have to wait until buildout in 30 years to get the parks? Can this access be moved up for the benefit of current residents?

    Tracy asked 3 months ago

    Public access to the proposed Community Parks will be determined through a Parks Management Plan, to be prepared in conjunction with the City of Mission Parks Department, in order to balance the competing needs of conservation and recreation. Neighbourhood Parks are dedicated to the City through individual subdivision applications as part of the phased development of the CNP. It is important that parks are timed with community development phasing to ensure construction and maintenance of amenities are funded by the development and not taxpayers.

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    What is being done to minimize negative impacts to existing residents such as diversion or contamination of water feeding their wells? What plan will mitigate the surge in dump truck traffic through rural areas? Trucks are already cutting through residential areas and increased truck traffic will make this much worse.

    Tracy asked 3 months ago

    In addition to the Silverdale Comprehensive Planning Area-wide studies completed for the Master Infrastructure Strategy, the CNP has completed a high-level assessment of groundwater conditions on the neighbourhood scale, which is available as part of the Phase 1 findings here: (https://www.mission.ca/wp-content/uploads/CNP-Phase1-Geotechnical-Hazard-Report.pdf).

    An Integrated Rainwater Management Plan is being completed as part of the Preferred Neighbourhood Plan, which will ensure that post-development hydrological flows match pre-development hydrological flows.

    Although construction-related truck traffic will increase, as it does in all growing communities, trucks should adhere to the City’s Good Neighbour Bylaw-regulated hours of operation. 

    The CNP will feature the City’s new site-adaptive Livable Street Standards along with a Traffic Impact Assessment to ensure new streets manage traffic demands at full build-out.

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    Mission has adopted principles of reconciliation. How will these principles be manifest in decision making for this development? Does the policy still call for naming Silverdale's streets after settlers?

    Tracy asked 3 months ago

    The City of Mission is implementing the adopted Principles of Reconciliation through consultation with local First Nations. In accordance with the Council-approved CNP Communication and Public Engagement Strategy, First Nations are being provided with balanced and objective information to assist in understanding the technical studies and proposed plans, and have been invited to provide feedback. Consultation with First Nations is being conducted by the City through direct government-to-government engagement.

    The Council-adopted Guiding Planning Principles for the CNP call for “memorializing local people, places, events and known archaeological sites by promoting local and indigenous history”, which may include using indigenous place names where appropriate and approved by local First Nations.

Page last updated: 17 August 2021, 14:53