Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan


The City of Mission is in the process of developing a master plan to revitalize one of the last and largest underdeveloped urban Fraser River waterfronts in the Lower Mainland. This Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan will direct growth, attract investment, and create a resilient and vibrant waterfront community.


Thank you for your participation in Phase 2!

The master planning process requires input from residents, landowners, business owners, and other community stakeholders. Everyone has an opportunity to influence the decisions about how Mission’s Waterfront will take shape. The input shared in Phase 2 will be used to help finalize the draft Master Plan. Please join us for Phase 3 in Spring 2022 for the final engagement phase in this master planning process!

Stay updated! Checkout the links to the right to explore materials shared from past public engagement phases.

Do you represent an organization with an interest in the future of the waterfront? Please email waterfront@mission.ca to indicate your organization's interest in participating in workshops throughout this Master Plan process to provide your insight and input.


About the Project

Mission’s waterfront represents a significant opportunity to establish a positive, meaningful connection with the Fraser River that redefines these underutilized lands as a premiere place to live, work and play in a growing region.

Revitalizing the waterfront has many benefits that extend beyond Mission to the rest of the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland and will increase access to opportunities, support sustainability, and drive investment and bold economic development.

To facilitate this vision, the District of Mission is preparing a Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan for the entire 296 acres of waterfront land identified in the 2020 Official Community Plan update.


What is Revitalization?

Revitalization seeks to realize the social, cultural, and economic potential of the waterfront through a combination of public and private investment that will sustainably facilitate the creation of new homes, businesses, and great community spaces.


What is a Master Plan?

The Master Plan will be the guiding document for future development, infrastructure, and public realm investments throughout the waterfront’s 296 acres of land. The Master Plan will be informed by rigorous technical engineering studies and market analyses to ensure that it is not only visionary, but also implementable.


What’s Next?

Following Phase 2 of engagement the project team will prepare a preferred development option for the waterfront. This preferred option as well as key components of the Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan will be brought back to the public in early 2022 for Phase 3 of engagement.

The final plan is scheduled to be brought to Council for consideration in May 2022.


The City of Mission is in the process of developing a master plan to revitalize one of the last and largest underdeveloped urban Fraser River waterfronts in the Lower Mainland. This Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan will direct growth, attract investment, and create a resilient and vibrant waterfront community.


Thank you for your participation in Phase 2!

The master planning process requires input from residents, landowners, business owners, and other community stakeholders. Everyone has an opportunity to influence the decisions about how Mission’s Waterfront will take shape. The input shared in Phase 2 will be used to help finalize the draft Master Plan. Please join us for Phase 3 in Spring 2022 for the final engagement phase in this master planning process!

Stay updated! Checkout the links to the right to explore materials shared from past public engagement phases.

Do you represent an organization with an interest in the future of the waterfront? Please email waterfront@mission.ca to indicate your organization's interest in participating in workshops throughout this Master Plan process to provide your insight and input.


About the Project

Mission’s waterfront represents a significant opportunity to establish a positive, meaningful connection with the Fraser River that redefines these underutilized lands as a premiere place to live, work and play in a growing region.

Revitalizing the waterfront has many benefits that extend beyond Mission to the rest of the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland and will increase access to opportunities, support sustainability, and drive investment and bold economic development.

To facilitate this vision, the District of Mission is preparing a Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan for the entire 296 acres of waterfront land identified in the 2020 Official Community Plan update.


What is Revitalization?

Revitalization seeks to realize the social, cultural, and economic potential of the waterfront through a combination of public and private investment that will sustainably facilitate the creation of new homes, businesses, and great community spaces.


What is a Master Plan?

The Master Plan will be the guiding document for future development, infrastructure, and public realm investments throughout the waterfront’s 296 acres of land. The Master Plan will be informed by rigorous technical engineering studies and market analyses to ensure that it is not only visionary, but also implementable.


What’s Next?

Following Phase 2 of engagement the project team will prepare a preferred development option for the waterfront. This preferred option as well as key components of the Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan will be brought back to the public in early 2022 for Phase 3 of engagement.

The final plan is scheduled to be brought to Council for consideration in May 2022.

Ask a question about the Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan

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  • Will the property at 32380 Lougheed Hwy. be affected?

    Western asked 8 days ago

    Please be advised that the property at 32380 Lougheed Highway is not within the Waterfront Comprehensive Planning Area.  

  • Having been a resident of Mission for over 20 years, I have come to love this area we call home. Having raised 3 youngsters, I see the same problem that plagues small communities. The dis proportionate emphasis placed on resident taxes. Councils build to the demands of developers. We build housing to feed the metro areas, but what about the children of all the people we promise a good life to? They need above minimal wage jobs! Mission has a drastic shortage of industry. Why? because we keep pushing residential and commercial to the top. We have limited feasible industrial lands and this project will force more industries like mine to fail. Where would an automotive business move to? Why would a medium industry move to? You are proposing that we give up the industry tax producing lands and replace them with residential ( more tax to home owners), and commercial ( there are so many vacancies) with more of the same. It is time to step out of the box. Mission has and always will have limited space, the trains and the raceway. Let us embrace this, Develop the industrial lands into job providing spaces, move residential into the hills and thrive. The river does not need another quay. You missed the opportunity with the Meakin proposal. Putting residential and commercial interests on the much needed industrial lands is as bad as proposing that city hall be moved to the waterfront. Aside from developers... who will it benefit? Who will benefit from any of the waterfront plan? Residents will pay the majority of the taxes, their children will be limited to minimal wage jobs, and industry will be pushed to other districts. IMO

    tim raw asked 28 days ago


    Good Day Tim Raw

    A key element of the waterfront plan is to promote local employment.  The City recognizes the decline of primary industrial activities such as forestry, agriculture, and fishing operations have altered the Mission Waterfront.  The view of the future is to attract jobs in the secondary, tertiary and quaternary industries that can benefit from easily accessible highway, rail, and water transportation, and the stable, educated labour force that characterizes Mission.   

    The proposed Waterfront plan focuses secondary industrial style employment on the lands west of the CPR bridge.  You will find these lands identified by the brown colors on the maps contained on this website. This is where you could expect semi trucks bringing loads in & out as part of the industrial activity.  

    The plan has a higher emphasis on tertiary and quaternary industrial employment activities on the lands east of the CPR Bridge.  These industries are more service oriented to the end-user.  This is where commercial shops and services would be concentrated in a more urban setting.  The ground floor street-front would be occupied by businesses, and parking for the upper residential units nestled behind.  The residential uses add to the client base of the local businesses.  We anticipate that the Waterfront could house 10,000 residents in walkable neighbourhoods.  

    The idea of residential uses above industry recognizes that many higher-ordered industrial uses no longer emit toxic pollutants.  Many industries simply need space and a stable, skill-trained, labour market to manufacture, assemble, produce, warehouse and conduct the research on their goods and services.  Some industries are not residential friendly.  Therefore, no residential uses are proposed to coexist on the industrial lands adjacent the Raceway.

    By multi-layering land uses, the productive capacity of the land is increased.  This increases total tax revenue, but the tax burden is proportionately reduced for individuals because taxes are spread out amongst the different users occupying the property. Not all industries are adaptable to multi-layering land uses, but the plan provides the flexibility where those industrial uses, such as clean warehousing, manufacturing, high-tech and service providers that generate employment opportunities can also contribute to create a more urban, vibrant waterfront. The plan seeks to add to Mission’s existing lifestyle and outdoor recreational experiences in order to attract and retain the skilled labour force the new industries will need.                    

    It is thought it will take over 40 years for the area to build out. The employment lands west of the CPR bridge are expected to develop first.  These lands are currently being filled with dredged river sand to achieve flood protection levels.  The lands east of the CPR bridge will take longer to reflect the vision because of the different attributes, such as land ownership and flood protection, affects the economies of scale for revitalization.  

    All will benefit by revitalization. Landowners would benefit from the more productive use of their lands, shop owners would benefit from an increased client base, and residents would benefit as local employment opportunities increase and new amenities are provided.   

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts.   We hope we have clarified the plan and its intentions to attract different levels of industrial activities while creating a new waterfront community.  We look forward to your continued participation in defining Mission’s future.     

  • I have a second question. This development will take 30 to 40 years to complete. Transportation and transit will look very different in 40 years as will the population of Mission. Is accessibility to the area being planned for with this in mind? Specifically in the first area to be developed will it be walkable, with cycling lanes? Will the infrastructure be designed to support the changes we are likely to see in the next 40 years?

    ddove asked about 2 months ago

    Good Afternoon ddove

    Accessibility in, and to, the waterfront area is being planned with a 40 year outlook. Walkability and the ability to move about the neighbourhood without automobiles is a key objective of the Waterfront Plan.  A complete infrastructure network including trails and multi-use paths to facilitate safe walking, cycling, and connections to public transit facilities are proposed.  

    Highway 11 is proposed to extend eastward connecting at Stave Lake Street and the Lougheed Highway.  This will provide another way in and out of the waterfront area besides the Murray Street and Cedar Valley Connector.   A pedestrian / cycling overpass connecting Welton and Mershon Streets is also contemplated in all three concept plans to strengthen the connectivity between the Waterfront and the Downtown areas.        

  • I would really like to see a walking path or trail kept along the rivers edge. It is a beautiful area to walk with the dogs and kids . We really enjoy seeing the tug barges, fishing boats and birds. Im sure these pathway users will supports the new businesses that will be in this new development.

    JASONH asked about 2 months ago

    Good Morning JasonH

    The concept plans  propose a pathway extending from one end of the waterfront area to the other  - a distance of over 3 km.  We are interested in hearing how residents think about how that pathway should look. Should it be a hard surface, crushed gravel, lite at night, ... ? Feel free to share your opinions.  

  • Will there be indigenous art incorporated into the waterfront? I would love to see little signs along the walkway to share the history of mission and its locals. Would love to see solar powered lights pointed down along the path so it’s safe to walk at night, and also benches to rest along the way. A grassy spot to lay out in summer and enjoy the view would be nice as well. And maybe something small for the kids somewhere.. perhaps a small spray park or a climbing wall?

    V asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts. The intention is to incorporate indigenous art & culture, as well as that of other cultures, into the waterfront community.  A number of ideas have been raised to make the walk along the waterfront an interesting & pleasant experience.   

  • I would like to comment on the plan for trails along the river and the west side of the race track. I think this needs to happen right at the beginning of development. Allowing people access and an opportunity to explore and experience this area will strengthen the connection that the Residence of mission half with the area. The more connected people are, more committed they will be to preserving and ensuring that is protected. I would like to see this brought up to the initial development phase.

    ddove asked about 2 months ago

    The Experience the Fraser Trail is a component in all 3 concept plans for the Waterfront. Generally, public trails and utility corridors that also serve as trails are acquired as part of a development application, or when the City has a need to rebuild or acquire right-of-ways to serve a public purpose. Establishing a complete connection from one end of the Waterfront to the other will take time.  You can expect some parts to the trail system to be established in the early years, and other parts later on.        

  • Will there be a skate park with lights and a cover for the kids?

    Gtg asked about 2 months ago

    Good Afternoon Gtg

    Thanks for sharing your ideas. Many ideas about the possible recreation features in the waterfront have been brought forward. We are looking into being able to use the area under the Mission Abbotsford bridge as a covered outdoor area. Nothing is confirmed, and we need to look into the details. We will have a better sense of what is possible as we work through the preferred land use plan. Stay tuned. 

  • Hopefully with new buildings comin in that they will be at a certain height ,so we can still see the view?

    Gtg asked about 2 months ago

    The preservation of view corridors is  a consideration in the planning process. This includes considering the views to and from Mission’s upper slopes, the views for people walking along streets and trails in the waterfront area, and the views from across the Fraser River to Mission.                

  • I am also concerned about the raceway. As soon as you develop the rest, the people moving into the area will complain of the noise and try to have the raceway removed. This always happens by railways, airports, raceways.

    Lynn asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your comments Lynn.

    There are no plans to change the status of the Raceway.  We have heard strong opinions both in favor and against the raceway.  There is thought on how the noise from the raceway may be buffered by the placement of non-residential buildings around the site and see the need for further conversations on this issue.  

  • Any plans to link this development with FVRD’s experience the fraser dyke trail network? I understand this is meant to make a dyke trail network linking several communities together

    Derrick asked about 2 months ago

    Good Morning Derrick

    The trail system in the Waterfront will connect to the 'Experience the Fraser' trail system running east and west of this area.

Page last updated: 21 January 2022, 12:03