Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan

The City of Mission is in the process of revitalizing one of the last and largest underdeveloped urban Fraser River waterfronts in the Lower Mainland. The Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan will direct growth, attract investment, and create a resilient and vibrant waterfront community.


About the Project

Mission’s waterfront represents a significant opportunity to establish a positive, meaningful connection with the Fraser River that redefines these underutilized lands as a premier place to live, work and play in a growing region.

Revitalizing the waterfront has many benefits that extend beyond Mission to the rest of the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland and will increase access to opportunities, support sustainability, and drive investment and bold economic development.

To facilitate this vision, the City of Mission prepared the Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan for the entire 296 acres of waterfront land identified in the 2020 Official Community Plan update. The Master Plan may be viewed here: https://engage.mission.ca/18448/widgets/88216/documents/82485



What is Revitalization?

Revitalization seeks to realize the social, cultural, and economic potential of the waterfront through a combination of public and private investment that will sustainably facilitate the creation of new homes, businesses, and great community spaces.


What is a Master Plan?

The Master Plan will be the guiding document for future development, infrastructure, and public realm investments throughout the waterfront’s 296 acres of land. The Master Plan will be informed by rigorous technical engineering studies and market analyses to ensure that it is not only visionary but also implementable.


What’s Next?

The Official Community Plan (OCP) was amended to facilitate the Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan becoming the primary reference for all development in the Waterfront Comprehensive Planning Area on July 4, 2022. The focus will now shift to how implementation of the Master Plan may be supported. The Implementation Plan will be based on the City's goals and the steps required to reduce risk & increase certainty in order to attract investment. Continued engagement with First Nations, landowners, stakeholders, other level of government and the community will inform the development of the City's strategies.

The City of Mission is in the process of revitalizing one of the last and largest underdeveloped urban Fraser River waterfronts in the Lower Mainland. The Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan will direct growth, attract investment, and create a resilient and vibrant waterfront community.


About the Project

Mission’s waterfront represents a significant opportunity to establish a positive, meaningful connection with the Fraser River that redefines these underutilized lands as a premier place to live, work and play in a growing region.

Revitalizing the waterfront has many benefits that extend beyond Mission to the rest of the Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland and will increase access to opportunities, support sustainability, and drive investment and bold economic development.

To facilitate this vision, the City of Mission prepared the Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan for the entire 296 acres of waterfront land identified in the 2020 Official Community Plan update. The Master Plan may be viewed here: https://engage.mission.ca/18448/widgets/88216/documents/82485



What is Revitalization?

Revitalization seeks to realize the social, cultural, and economic potential of the waterfront through a combination of public and private investment that will sustainably facilitate the creation of new homes, businesses, and great community spaces.


What is a Master Plan?

The Master Plan will be the guiding document for future development, infrastructure, and public realm investments throughout the waterfront’s 296 acres of land. The Master Plan will be informed by rigorous technical engineering studies and market analyses to ensure that it is not only visionary but also implementable.


What’s Next?

The Official Community Plan (OCP) was amended to facilitate the Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan becoming the primary reference for all development in the Waterfront Comprehensive Planning Area on July 4, 2022. The focus will now shift to how implementation of the Master Plan may be supported. The Implementation Plan will be based on the City's goals and the steps required to reduce risk & increase certainty in order to attract investment. Continued engagement with First Nations, landowners, stakeholders, other level of government and the community will inform the development of the City's strategies.

Ask a question about the Waterfront Revitalization Master Plan

loader image
Didn't receive confirmation?
Seems like you are already registered, please provide the password. Forgot your password? Create a new one now.
  • Are there any plans to upgrade the current roadways coming in and out of mission

    Michelle Joan asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for the question.

    The Waterfront Plan advocates extending Highway 11 eastward to improve access in and out of Mission.    Highway 11 is under the jurisdiction of the provincial Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure (MoTI).  The plan assumes the highway bypass will happen and will extend through the waterfront to Highway 7 at Stave Lake St.  The municipal design team included engineering and traffic design consultants, as well as internal engineering staff, have extensive experience working with (MoTI).  The work is on-going.

  • Hello. We are curious if there would be the opportunity to have a permanent story walk structure along the development park area.

    Mission Literacy in a Motion. asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    There is opportunity to provide a variety of stories and educational materials on monuments as part of the open spaces and the Fraser foreshore promenade.   The discussions to date have been on enlightening people about the environment, aspects of Mission’s history, the physical geography, and the sharing of indigenous knowledge.  

    In addition to the monuments, a structure is proposed along the waterfront near the foot of Horne Street for cultural, art, performance, and community market activities.  The nature, programming, timing, and design of these features will be phased in over the life of the plan.  

  • Is it a good idea to build housing on land that is so close to the river? From what I recall in school, liquefies when it is shaken. Wouldn't that be like living on quicksand lol!! Also, from what I recall, the river's soot/soil is full of nutrients! Would like to see the land used wisely, thinking proactively about the future environment for people that live here.

    loneymaroney asked 5 months ago

    As part of the Mission waterfront planning process, geotechnical engineering were consulted.  By employing the proper construction technique, there will be a number of solutions to lessen the effects of liquefaction. The developer of a property will need to assess the appropriate construction technique for their proposal to account for the effect of seismic events as per the Building Code.

    Floodplain soils do carry nutrients  The Waterfront Plan will provide an opportunity to incorporate community gardens for the people that will live in the area.       

  • I would love to move to Mission, but it seems impossible. There is a real lack of housing available, especially for first time homebuyers. Would love to see some townhouse projects that are at an affordable price, and with enough room for growing families. Are there developments like this in the works?

    V asked 6 months ago

    Good Morning 

    Thanks for the inquiry. 

    The City of Mission adopted a new Affordable Housing Strategy on February 7th 2022 to reduce housing gaps, support collaboration with partners, and ensure residents have access to affordable and diverse housing options now and in the future.   The Waterfront is part of this City-wide initiative and the area is expected to provide a variety of housing options suitable for an urban lifestyle.  

    Access to affordable and diverse housing options helps to ensure Mission can support population growth and economic sustainability, while fostering vibrancy, social cohesion, strong health outcomes and livability.    Once the Waterfront Master Plan is adopted later this year, residential development applications in the neighbourhood will be evaluated on their contribution towards addressing the City’s housing needs.

  • Hello! I was wondering how long this project will take? I am very excited about it and of course it will take some time but do you have an estimate for how long it would take?

    Gavin asked 6 months ago

    Hello Gavin

    Thanks for the question.  The overall speed of waterfront revitalization will be influenced by real estate market trends.  That said, we anticipate it will take +40 years for the waterfront area to build out.  Some neighbourhoods within the waterfront will redevelop faster than others.

  • Can we have a public area where we can host public event such as movie night, band playing music, a reading area and a swimming pool. That way the waterfront will be active.

    Nawl asked 7 months ago

    There will be a wide variety of public areas in the Waterfront area to enjoy different activities.  The ability to experience the Fraser is a key element of the proposed Master Plan.  The activities and venues will be refined as the area builds out.  Public facilities such as a swimming pool or ice rink have been discussed in the context of these types of facilities needing to serve and be accessible to all Mission residents.  An active Waterfront is a strategic goal of the Master Plan. Thank you for sharing your ideas.  

  • Will the property at 32380 Lougheed Hwy. be affected?

    Western asked 7 months ago

    Please be advised that the property at 32380 Lougheed Highway is not within the Waterfront Comprehensive Planning Area.  

  • Having been a resident of Mission for over 20 years, I have come to love this area we call home. Having raised 3 youngsters, I see the same problem that plagues small communities. The dis proportionate emphasis placed on resident taxes. Councils build to the demands of developers. We build housing to feed the metro areas, but what about the children of all the people we promise a good life to? They need above minimal wage jobs! Mission has a drastic shortage of industry. Why? because we keep pushing residential and commercial to the top. We have limited feasible industrial lands and this project will force more industries like mine to fail. Where would an automotive business move to? Why would a medium industry move to? You are proposing that we give up the industry tax producing lands and replace them with residential ( more tax to home owners), and commercial ( there are so many vacancies) with more of the same. It is time to step out of the box. Mission has and always will have limited space, the trains and the raceway. Let us embrace this, Develop the industrial lands into job providing spaces, move residential into the hills and thrive. The river does not need another quay. You missed the opportunity with the Meakin proposal. Putting residential and commercial interests on the much needed industrial lands is as bad as proposing that city hall be moved to the waterfront. Aside from developers... who will it benefit? Who will benefit from any of the waterfront plan? Residents will pay the majority of the taxes, their children will be limited to minimal wage jobs, and industry will be pushed to other districts. IMO

    tim raw asked 8 months ago


    Good Day Tim Raw

    A key element of the waterfront plan is to promote local employment.  The City recognizes the decline of primary industrial activities such as forestry, agriculture, and fishing operations have altered the Mission Waterfront.  The view of the future is to attract jobs in the secondary, tertiary and quaternary industries that can benefit from easily accessible highway, rail, and water transportation, and the stable, educated labour force that characterizes Mission.   

    The proposed Waterfront plan focuses secondary industrial style employment on the lands west of the CPR bridge.  You will find these lands identified by the brown colors on the maps contained on this website. This is where you could expect semi trucks bringing loads in & out as part of the industrial activity.  

    The plan has a higher emphasis on tertiary and quaternary industrial employment activities on the lands east of the CPR Bridge.  These industries are more service oriented to the end-user.  This is where commercial shops and services would be concentrated in a more urban setting.  The ground floor street-front would be occupied by businesses, and parking for the upper residential units nestled behind.  The residential uses add to the client base of the local businesses.  We anticipate that the Waterfront could house 10,000 residents in walkable neighbourhoods.  

    The idea of residential uses above industry recognizes that many higher-ordered industrial uses no longer emit toxic pollutants.  Many industries simply need space and a stable, skill-trained, labour market to manufacture, assemble, produce, warehouse and conduct the research on their goods and services.  Some industries are not residential friendly.  Therefore, no residential uses are proposed to coexist on the industrial lands adjacent the Raceway.

    By multi-layering land uses, the productive capacity of the land is increased.  This increases total tax revenue, but the tax burden is proportionately reduced for individuals because taxes are spread out amongst the different users occupying the property. Not all industries are adaptable to multi-layering land uses, but the plan provides the flexibility where those industrial uses, such as clean warehousing, manufacturing, high-tech and service providers that generate employment opportunities can also contribute to create a more urban, vibrant waterfront. The plan seeks to add to Mission’s existing lifestyle and outdoor recreational experiences in order to attract and retain the skilled labour force the new industries will need.                    

    It is thought it will take over 40 years for the area to build out. The employment lands west of the CPR bridge are expected to develop first.  These lands are currently being filled with dredged river sand to achieve flood protection levels.  The lands east of the CPR bridge will take longer to reflect the vision because of the different attributes, such as land ownership and flood protection, affects the economies of scale for revitalization.  

    All will benefit by revitalization. Landowners would benefit from the more productive use of their lands, shop owners would benefit from an increased client base, and residents would benefit as local employment opportunities increase and new amenities are provided.   

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts.   We hope we have clarified the plan and its intentions to attract different levels of industrial activities while creating a new waterfront community.  We look forward to your continued participation in defining Mission’s future.     

  • I have a second question. This development will take 30 to 40 years to complete. Transportation and transit will look very different in 40 years as will the population of Mission. Is accessibility to the area being planned for with this in mind? Specifically in the first area to be developed will it be walkable, with cycling lanes? Will the infrastructure be designed to support the changes we are likely to see in the next 40 years?

    ddove asked 8 months ago

    Good Afternoon ddove

    Accessibility in, and to, the waterfront area is being planned with a 40 year outlook. Walkability and the ability to move about the neighbourhood without automobiles is a key objective of the Waterfront Plan.  A complete infrastructure network including trails and multi-use paths to facilitate safe walking, cycling, and connections to public transit facilities are proposed.  

    Highway 11 is proposed to extend eastward connecting at Stave Lake Street and the Lougheed Highway.  This will provide another way in and out of the waterfront area besides the Murray Street and Cedar Valley Connector.   A pedestrian / cycling overpass connecting Welton and Mershon Streets is also contemplated in all three concept plans to strengthen the connectivity between the Waterfront and the Downtown areas.        

  • I would really like to see a walking path or trail kept along the rivers edge. It is a beautiful area to walk with the dogs and kids . We really enjoy seeing the tug barges, fishing boats and birds. Im sure these pathway users will supports the new businesses that will be in this new development.

    JASONH asked 8 months ago

    Good Morning JasonH

    The concept plans  propose a pathway extending from one end of the waterfront area to the other  - a distance of over 3 km.  We are interested in hearing how residents think about how that pathway should look. Should it be a hard surface, crushed gravel, lite at night, ... ? Feel free to share your opinions.  

Page last updated: 10 Aug 2022, 12:08 PM